STAR-TRAIN

Further education programs on the German national clinical guideline for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents

Keywords

Non-suicidal self-injury, NSSI, deliberate self harm, dissemination, guidelines, training

Project Management

Cooperation Partners

  • Prof. Dr. Paul L. Plener, Medical University Vienna (STAR Consortium)  
  • Prof. Dr. Michael Kaess, University Hospital Heidelberg (STAR-Online)
  • Prof. Dr. Christian Schmahl, Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim (STAR-Neuro)
  • Prof. Dr. Tina In-Albon, University of Koblenz-Landau (STAR-Assess)
  • Prof. Dr. Ulrich Ebner-Priemer, Karlsruher Institute of Technology (STAR-EMA)
  • Dr. Daniel Radeloff, University of Leipzig (STAR-Data)

     

Project Term

11/2017-10/2021

Background & Aim of the Project

Star-Train is part of the consortium STAR (Self-Injury: Treatment, Assessment, Recovery) which has the focus on understanding the course of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescence, especially with regard to psychological mechanisms of stopping NSSI and possible neurobiological predictors. Based on those insights, specific future intervention and prevention strategies can be conceptualized and conducted to improve the psychosocial care for those affected.

NSSI is a widespread phenomenon among adolescents with a prevalence rate of 4% for repetitive NSSI. Given that high number, primary health care providers often encounter NSSI in their practice and are in a privileged position to guide youths to accept treatment. Subsequently, they should hold knowledge and competences in dealing with NSSI.

A new national AWMF guideline on the treatment of NSSI was published in 2015, offering the necessary information for professionals. However, it is known that often guidelines lack dissemination. It seems crucial to develop strategies for disseminating clinical guidelines among prime health care providers to optimize the care in the mentioned population.

Description of the Project

Star-Train is part of the consortium STAR (Self-Injury: Treatment, Assessment, Recovery) which has the focus on understanding the course of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescence, especially with regard to psychological mechanisms of stopping NSSI and possible neurobiological predictors. Based on those insights, specific future intervention and prevention strategies can be conceptualized and conducted to improve the psychosocial care for those affected.

NSSI is a widespread phenomenon among adolescents with a prevalence rate of 4% for repetitive NSSI. Given that high number, primary health care providers often encounter NSSI in their practice and are in a privileged position to guide youths to accept treatment. Subsequently, they should hold knowledge and competences in dealing with NSSI and those affected. Additionally a multiple-choice-test of NSSI is assessed. To ensure quality of learning formats, user-satisfaction is surveyed.

Current Data of the pretest-posttest comparison group design show that knowledge, practical skills, and self-efficacy in handling cases of NSSI raise for all participants and that attitudes towards NSSI and those affected are improved. There is no difference between the learning formats, thus all participants profit equally from their training. User satisfaction is high. Results of this study suggest that the developed different training strategies can contribute equally to a better understanding and enhance skills of professionals regarding NSSI.

Contact Address

Funded by

Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)